Newport Beach, CA – Balboa Fun Zone (HDR)


This past Saturday was the Scott Kelby Worldwide Photowalk. I attended the walk in Newport Beach, CA at the Balboa Fun Zone. We had a great turnout. About 25 people…roughly. I wanted to HDR..and broke off from the group to see what I could find. I met Frank standing next to me during the beginning speech and he joined me for some HDR’ing. We wanted to see what HDR’s we could find at the Fun Zone. We walked up and down the streets…unfortunately, not a Fun Zone for HDR. I wanted to try an arcade in HDR. We walked into one and thought…Skee Ball in HDR…why not?? Might be cool?

Afterwards we hit the beach to take pics of the pier. Look for a shot from here soon! I enjoyed my night and snagged a couple nice shots. Frank, nice to meet you and hope you got a few shots as well! I might lead a walk next year. I have plan and if I can get it together…let ya know next late summer! How was your photo walk..if you attended?? Where did you shoot? Hope you had a great time!

Peter Talke Photography Settings:
Camera: Nikon D300
Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
Setting: Aperture Mode
Focal Length: 16.0 mm
ISO: 200
Exposure: HDR 7 Exposures (+3 to -3)
Aperture: f/10
Gear: Tripod
Post Process: Adobe CS6, HDR Efex Pro 2, OnOne Software Photo Tools 2.6

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Cleveland, Ohio – The Arcade (HDR)

While in Cleveland recently I went out shooting with my good friend David and we had a few target locations.  This was one.  I had never been…but it looked like a good spot for an HDR!   The Arcade is located downtown in Cleveland and the shops were closed for the night, so it was quiet.  Back in its day, I am sure it was amazing.   Now its a small shopping area to visit and admire its beauty.   Just by looking at it…you can tell it was designed years ago.   Gotta love places like this! Here is some info from the web:

In May of 1890, The Arcade opened its doors as one of the first indoor shopping centers in America. It was designed as a big-city mercantile center by John M. Eisenmann and George H. Smith who modeled it after the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan, Italy. The cost to construct The Arcade was $875,000 then, and was financed by many of Cleveland’s most esteemed businessmen of the late 19th century—among them: John D. Rockefeller, Steven V. Harkness, Louis Severance, Charles Brush and Marcus Hanna. Rockefeller and Harkness are featured on gold emblems on the Arcade’s Euclid Avenue exterior.  nce known as Cleveland’s Crystal Palace The Arcade has always been one of Cleveland’s best-known landmarks. For more than 100 years, The Arcade offered unique shops, services and restaurants among the five indoor balconies and offices in the two ten-story towers. The Arcade was the first building in Cleveland and the ninth in the country to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 14.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/22
  • Gear:  Tripod
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Viveza