Paris, France – The Louvre (HDR)

Here is a cool point of view HDR from Paris of the Louvre.  I was here recently and shot the Pyramid for an hour from tons of angles.  I shot this subject this evening with a wide angle lens and fisheye…trying to get something different.  For some reason this Pyramid draws me in like an orb.  LOL  I enjoy photographing it!

Here is some info on the Pyramid from the web:  It has been claimed by some that the glass panes in the Louvre Pyramid number exactly 666, “the number of the beast”, often associated with Satan. Various historical enthusiasts have speculated at the purpose of this factoid. For instance, Dominique Stezepfandt’s book François Mitterrand, Grand Architecte de l’Univers declares that “the pyramid is dedicated to a power described as the Beast in theBook of Revelation (…) The entire structure is based on the number 6.”

The story of the 666 panes originated in the 1980s, when the official brochure published during construction did indeed cite this number (even twice, though a few pages earlier the total number of panes was given as 672 instead). The number 666 was also mentioned in various newspapers. The Louvre museum however states that the finished pyramid contains 673 glass panes (603 rhombi and 70 triangles). A higher figure was obtained by David A. Shugarts, who reports that the pyramid contains 689 pieces of glass. Shugarts obtained the figure from the offices of I.M. Pei. Various attempts to actually count the panes in the pyramid have produced slightly discrepant results, but there are definitely more than 666. A quick calculation based on 18 units per edge with two tiers removed in the center at the entrance easily confirms the 673 number.[original research?].

The myth resurfaced in 2003, when Dan Brown incorporated it in his best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code. Here the protagonist reflects that “this pyramid, at President Mitterrand’s explicit demand, had been constructed of exactly 666 panes of glass – a bizarre request that had always been a hot topic among conspiracy buffs who claimed 666 was the number of Satan”.  However, David A. Shugarts reports that according to a spokeswoman of the offices of I.M. Pei, the French President never specified the number of panes to be used in the pyramid. Noting how the 666 rumor circulated in some French newspapers in the mid-1980s, she commented: “If you only found those old articles and didn’t do any deeper fact checking, and were extremely credulous, you might believe the 666 story”.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 12.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/5
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Color Efex Pro, Viveza
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5 comments on “Paris, France – The Louvre (HDR)

  1. […] the original here: Paris, France – The Louvre (HDR) « Places 2 Explore No TweetBacks yet. (Be the first to Tweet this post)AKPC_IDS += "4408,";Popularity: unranked […]

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  3. Shane says:

    Great information. I love your blog. I also enjoyed the Louvre its overwhelming and the best way to approach it is not to do too much in one day.

  4. Oleg says:

    Realy cool HDR! I was in paris last year and create some HDRs too 😉

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