Paris, France – Le Grande Roue (HDR)

The fun of photography is to find a subject and take a shot in with a different view.  Challenge yourself to photograph a subject like no other has taken before.  I do this as much as possible.  Of course I take the standard shots, but afterwards, I let my camera have fun and try all kinds of angles.   As long I know the subject is interesting, why not?  ..and we are shooting digitally, so use up that compact flash card!

I am sure we have all seen ferris wheel shots, so here is my take on Le Grande Roue in HDR!  Tilted a bit and the multiple exposures create a cool motion flow.  Go onto Flickr or any photo site, what makes a photo interesting?  Not only the subject, but the composition is very important.   Have fun with your camera, just don’t take the shots every tourist is taking.  Amazing shots may be the outcome!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 24.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/4
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Color Efex Pro

Johnson City, Texas Feed Mill (HDR)

As soon as I purchased my new fisheye lens a few months ago I wanted to go out and give it a try!  I took a drive out to Johnson City as I have always driven by this old abandoned Feed Mill…it has lots of character.  I walked around and took a bunch of shots and liked this old building with shoes nailed to it!  Quite interesting!   From walking around I can tell there was a antique store, a bar, a restaurant and housing located on the property.  It was a nice sunny day and luckily this place is right near the main road…cause its a bit spooky!   If you look at the picture and follow the path down the middle you can see some of the little housing shacks.   Kinda reminded me of the Texas Chainsaw incident!   I didn’t want to bump into Leatherface!  I kept my eyes and ears open while walking around.    When I was just about done, I bumped into and old guy (about 90 years old) out front.  He used to work there and told me that they have plans to refurbish the mill into a nice restaurant one day.   Stop on by if you do not mind eerie places!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 10.5 Fisheye f/2.8
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 10.5.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/13
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Color Efex Pro

Austin, Texas – Long Center (HDR)

A few weeks back when I was taking shots of the Austin Skyline located by Auditorium Shores, I walked up and took a few of the Long Center.   I do not think you see too many shots of this location as it is a bit bland.   However just under the front part of the oval on the ground is a platform.  While shooting I saw a portrait photographer taking shots of a band there.  The backgound would be the skyline.  Cool idea!  I may have to try that one day!   I grabbed this shot just a few minutes before sunset and converted it to black and white.

Here is some info from the web: In November 1998, the citizens of Austin voted to approve the City’s lease of the Lester E. Palmer Auditorium to the nonprofit group Arts Center Stage for renovation into a community performing arts venue.  In April 1999, Arts Center Stage received its lead gift of $20 million from Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long, and the Arts Center Stage project was renamed the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Center for the Performing Arts.

The Long Center for the Performing Arts is founded on the belief that the performing arts are essential components in the quality of life of our community. Our performing arts organizations – from the smallest to the largest – deserve and need facilities that reflect their contribution to the culture of our community. Therefore, our mission is to manage a state-of-the-art, multi-venue facility that will host the broad spectrum of Austin’s performing arts organizations.

I have never been a performance there, but I am sure its wonderful!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 12.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/22
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Silver Efex Pro, Viveza

Myrtle Beach, SC – Kiss Coffeehouse

When I was younger I belonged in the KISS Army!  I know dating myself again.  I had all the records of KISS….yes, records.  Even before 8 Tracks…yikes I may be old!?  LOL  So when we visited Myrtle Beach this past summer we stopped on by the Broadway at the Beach shopping area and walked around looking for dinner.  Unbeknownst to us….we walk by and see this coffee house!   How classic!  The KISS Coffeehouse! I had no idea such a place existed.  So we went in an checked it out.  Memorabilia and merchandise are all over the store…and you really can get some great coffee!    I grabbed a T-Shirt and took a few pics.  If you are in Myrtle Beach go check it out!     You may Rock-N-Roll All Nite!!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 18-200 VR f/3.5-5.6
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 18.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:   1/1000 sec
  • Aperture:  f/4
  • Gear:  Hand Held
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Topaz Adjust

London, England – Buckingham Palace Garden (Infrared)

I am lucky enough to travel to England once a year and really enjoy London!  London is a fantastic place to visit for vacation!  So much to do and see and the city is amazing to explore!   As Paris is my favorite city in the world…London is my second favorite!   After my days work I enjoy walking around the city.  I usually stay at Trafalgar Square and just behind my hotel about 1 mile away is Buckingham Palace.  On the grounds are these wonderful gardens you can stroll around and enjoy the views.

Here is ome info from the web:  The Garden at Buckingham Palace is situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. It covers much of the area of the former “Goring Great Garden”, named after Lord Goring, occupant of one of the earliest grand houses on the site. It was laid out by Henry Wise and subsequently redesigned by William Townsend Aiton for George IV.

The Garden occupies a 42 -acre (17 -hectare) site in the City of Westminster, London and has two-and-a-half miles of gravel paths. Its area is bounded by Constitution Hill to the north, Hyde Park Corner to the west, Grosvenor Place to the south-west and the Royal Mews, Queen’s Gallery, and Buckingham Palace to the south and east. The planting is varied and exotic, with a mulberry tree dating back to the time of James I of England. Notable features include a large 19th-century lake which is graced by a flock of flamingoes, and the Waterloo Vase. In the Garden there is a summerhouse, a helicopter pad, and a tennis court.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D70S (Converted to Infrared)
  • Infrared Conversion:  D70S modified by LifePixel
  • Lens: Nikon 18-70 f/3.5-4.5
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 40.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:   1/60 second
  • Aperture:  f/22
  • Gear:  Hand Held
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Silver Efex Pro

Frogger in HDR

If anyone played video games in the 80’s…I think I may have found Frogger in my yard!  This little guy was in our garden and he was nice enough to pose for a few shots.  Taking shots of any animals or any critter in HDR is tough…so I’d say using a single raw photo to produce your HDR is a great idea!   When you try to take multiple shots, they move and this creates a blur making your shot not so great.   You can also try this with sports shots as well!   I have seen some very cool motocross shots in HDR that look unreal!  The dirt kicking up and the colors of the riders uniforms = cool!!   I’d like to try shooting that one day!

Ah the memories of Frogger!  I grew up on Atari, Intellivsion and going to the arcades to play Frogger.  I preferred Dig Dug and Zaxxon!   Now these days its XBox Live and the Wii!!   Hope the little guy above hopped away and avoided traffic!   Always brings me back to the Seinfeld episode with George and the Frogger machine.  Funny!  Enjoy!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 105 VR F/2.8 (Macro Lens)
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 105.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  Single RAW HDR (1/400 sec)
  • Aperture:  f/10
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Color Efex Pro

Paris, France – The Louvre (HDR)

Here is a cool point of view HDR from Paris of the Louvre.  I was here recently and shot the Pyramid for an hour from tons of angles.  I shot this subject this evening with a wide angle lens and fisheye…trying to get something different.  For some reason this Pyramid draws me in like an orb.  LOL  I enjoy photographing it!

Here is some info on the Pyramid from the web:  It has been claimed by some that the glass panes in the Louvre Pyramid number exactly 666, “the number of the beast”, often associated with Satan. Various historical enthusiasts have speculated at the purpose of this factoid. For instance, Dominique Stezepfandt’s book François Mitterrand, Grand Architecte de l’Univers declares that “the pyramid is dedicated to a power described as the Beast in theBook of Revelation (…) The entire structure is based on the number 6.”

The story of the 666 panes originated in the 1980s, when the official brochure published during construction did indeed cite this number (even twice, though a few pages earlier the total number of panes was given as 672 instead). The number 666 was also mentioned in various newspapers. The Louvre museum however states that the finished pyramid contains 673 glass panes (603 rhombi and 70 triangles). A higher figure was obtained by David A. Shugarts, who reports that the pyramid contains 689 pieces of glass. Shugarts obtained the figure from the offices of I.M. Pei. Various attempts to actually count the panes in the pyramid have produced slightly discrepant results, but there are definitely more than 666. A quick calculation based on 18 units per edge with two tiers removed in the center at the entrance easily confirms the 673 number.[original research?].

The myth resurfaced in 2003, when Dan Brown incorporated it in his best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code. Here the protagonist reflects that “this pyramid, at President Mitterrand’s explicit demand, had been constructed of exactly 666 panes of glass – a bizarre request that had always been a hot topic among conspiracy buffs who claimed 666 was the number of Satan”.  However, David A. Shugarts reports that according to a spokeswoman of the offices of I.M. Pei, the French President never specified the number of panes to be used in the pyramid. Noting how the 666 rumor circulated in some French newspapers in the mid-1980s, she commented: “If you only found those old articles and didn’t do any deeper fact checking, and were extremely credulous, you might believe the 666 story”.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 12.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/5
  • Gear:  Tripod, Cable release
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Color Efex Pro, Viveza