Spicewood, TX – Krause Springs (HDR)


The summer is over and it is almost time for fall to arrive. Maybe in your area leaves will start turning soon? For us in Texas, we usually have to wait until November for any colored leaves. The HDR above is from the lovely Krause Springs in Spicewood, TX during a recent fall season here in TX. Not sure if we will have much color this year due to the super hot summer and lack of rain, but my fingers are crossed for some rain soon…this may help?

Spicewood, Texas – Krause Springs (Infrared)

From the fantastic Krause Springs in Spicewood, Texas…one of my favorite IR shots!   I love this place for photography.  I have visited a few times and always come out with cool pics!  I enjoy this little river that trails down from the swimming hole.  My tripod seems to set up shop here!    It is almost time for another visit here…the leaves are due to change colors in Texas in the next few weeks.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D70S (Converted to Infrared)
  • Infrared Conversion:  D70S modified by LifePixel
  • Lens: Nikon 12-12 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 18.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  1/5 second
  • Aperture:  f/22
  • Gear:  Tripod
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Color Efex Pro, Viveza, Silver Efex Pro

Austin, Texas – Moore’s Crossing (HDR-Infrared)

I took a long lunch yesterday and went to explore Moore’s Crossing here in Austin, Texas.  It is located a few minutes from the Austin International Airport.  I had no idea this place existed until my good friend Van Sutherland (blog: Exile Imaging) posted a shot from here just recently.  I was curious!   I Googled it and it has an interesting history!

Some info from the web…  Moore’s Crossing is a historic community southeast of Austin, Texas.  The area was settled in the 1840s near a low-water crossing for Onion Creek. It was named after John B. Moore, who opened a store at the site in the early 20th century. In 1915, three of six spans from the 1884 iron Congress Avenue Bridge, which had been put into storage in 1910, were used to construct a bridge at Moore’s Crossing (formerly Onion Creek Bridge). The bridge was washed away by a spring flood that year.

The current bridge, built by the Austin Bridge Company of Dallas is made of concrete piers and the remaining three spans from the Congress Avenue Bridge. It was completed in 1922 and took Burleson Road across Onion Creek to Farm to Market Road 973. On January 8, 1980, the bridge was “finally put to rest” after nearly 97 years. Richard Moya, Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4, stated the bridge would be closed because it could collapse. The concrete under the abutments had failed. The estimate to stabilize the one-lane bridge for traffic was $750,000 and that did not include widening it to support the increased traffic caused by area growth. A four-lane concrete beam bridge with a different alignment to Farm to Market Road 973 was built instead. The county barricaded the bridge at Moore’s Crossing and turned it into a pedestrian bridge. The bridge was recorded as a Texas Historic Landmark in 1980. The community was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 16, 1996.

On my next post from here…I hear this bridge is haunted!  Gotta love ghost stories!!  Coming soon!   Note this was produced using NIK’s HDR Efex Pro!

Don’t forget if you are in Austin tonite, I have my speech on IR Photography at the Austin SMUG Meeting tonite at 7 PM!   I will go through my eBook on IR Photography for DSLR’s.  Hope to see you there!

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D70S (Converted to Infrared)
  • Infrared Conversion:  D70S modified by LifePixel
  • Lens: Nikon 12-12 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 12.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 3 Exposures  (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/22
  • Gear:  Tripod
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, HDR Efex Pro, Viveza, Silver Efex Pro

Spicewood, Texas – Spicewood Vineyards (HDR)

Here isn the Texas Hill Country you can find a few wonderful vineyards.  One of the best is located in Spicewood, Texas called Spicewood Wineries.   I stopped by one afternoon and they allowed me to photograph their wine cellar.  Thanks Annie! =)  Unfortunately, I am not a wine fan, but can understand the lure of a nice glass during the evening after a hard day work.  If you are near Spciewood, they have a bar located inside and a lovely patio outdoors to sit, relax and unwind.   Tasting room hours are  Weds thru Sat 10-5 and Sunday 12-5, Monday and Tues by appointment only.

Wine cellars are great location for HDR’s.  The HDR can create magic with those barrels as you see above!  For this shot I added a golden tone to give the barrel room a nice warm effect.  I’ll post more shots from here one day soon.  Until then, hope you can enjoy a glass of wine tonite with dinner!  Cheers!!

Some info from the web:  Edward and Madeleine Manigold began Spicewood Vineyards in 1992 with a goal of making the finest wines possible from their vineyard in Spicewood. Their first Chardonnay won a silver medal in a national competition. After the Manigold’s promising start, the Yates family now continues the tradition of making fine wines that have won State, Regional, National and International competitions.

Spicewood Vineyards became a bonded Texas Hill Country winery in 1995. The original handcrafted winery building resembles a Texas hill country home of the 19th century, with board and batten walls and a front porch. The original building now provides space for storage of cased goods and a home for harvest workers. A new winery facility adjacent to the original building was completed in 1999. The winery building is approximately 5,000 square feet on two levels. The upper level has a large tasting and special events room, suitable for catered dinners, weddings, receptions, and other activities. There is a covered pavilion, with an adjoining water fountain and shaded area for sipping wine, picnicking, and viewing the vineyard and the Texas Hill Country.

The vineyard makes the wine on the lower level of the winery building. There are five large jacketed stainless steel tanks with a fermenting and storage capacity of more than 10,000 gallons of wine. The underground barrel room has space for more than 400 barrels. The winery has the capacity to produce more than 5,000 cases.

Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 12-24 f/4
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 22.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/8
  • Gear:  Tripod
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Viveza, Color Efex Pro
  • Swallowtail Butterfly

    While at Krause Springs in Spicewood, Texas…near the entrance they have a small butterfly garden.  You can find a few fluttering around.  Up on this cool looking plant/flower was this beautiful Swallowtail Butterfly.  The flowers were about 7 feet high so I was using my 105 Macro hand held to try and catch some photos.  He was a bit skittish, but was used to me in about 10 minutes.  The tough part was that it was breezy and these tall flowers were blowing in the wind.  A great challenge photographically!   I tried shooting manual and increased my shutter to 1/250 of a second.  Only a few shots came out.  As it always goes, this was my first photo.   The rest were a bit blurry.  A breeze or wind is a tough one in macro photography.   I was also curious to see how a butterfly works with fractalius and here is an extra version!   Enjoy the doubleshot!

    I just grouped all my Fractalius photos together in a gallery on my web site here…  Talke Photography

    Spicewood, Texas – Krause Springs (HDR)

    From the beautiful Krause Springs in Spicewood, TX.  The photo above was taken riverside with some great HDR subjects…Cypress trees.   Here is some info from the web:

    Krause Springs, 34 miles west of Austin in Spicewood, is possibly the most beautiful swimming hole in the state. Situated on a bluff overlooking Cypress Creek, Krause Springs is actually two swimming holes in one. As the rolling ranch land begins its rapid descent to the creek and Lake Travis, the Krause home sits at a high point with the parking lot. At the next level below the house is the spring-fed swimming pool and below that is the creek, lined with towering cypress trees and a waterfall coming over a cliff covered with ferns.

    Elton and Jane Krause bought the property in the 1950s from an aunt. Every year, Elton, his sons, and hired help find more improvements to add to the privately owned park. They did all of the landscaping that makes the area look like a tropical oasis and built all of the rock picnic benches. They used to have wooden picnic tables, but after every weekend the tables would be clustered together and they would have to spread them all out again. Elton retired to operate the park full-time in 1994. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was probably used by Native Americans for centuries before white settlers arrived. There are 32 springs throughout the campground, which made it perfect for the original Native American residents and now benefits latter-day campers and swimmers. Two springs feed the 70′ by 20′ swimming pool at a rate of 70 gallons a minute at a temperature of about 70 degrees. The springs have never slowed down, even during severe drought.

    Talke Photography Settings:

  • Camera:  Nikon D300
  • Lens: Nikon 18-200 f/3.5-5.6
  • Setting: Aperture  Mode
  • Focal Length: 27.0mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure:  HDR 5 exposures (+2 to -2)
  • Aperture:  f/16
  • Gear:  Tripod
  • Post Process: Adobe CS4, Photomatix, Viveza, Color Efex Pro